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CRIS BRUCH - How Did I Get Here? - A 20 Year Survey
June 21st - August 11th
Above: Installation View - LAWRIMORE project - MAIN SPACE
Left to right: CLEAVE, 2006; PERFECT LANDSCAPE, 2007; STRANGELAND, 2004


SKETCHBOOK, 2007
Wood, graphite, chalk
72 x 53 x 36 inches
[SOLD]


SKETCHBOOK, 2007 [Detail]
A 'crumpled page' sculpture made from 100s of facets cut from the large plywood sheets on which Bruch sketches his forms, gathers his conceptual thoughts, and computes the mathematical complexities of his work.


PERFECT LANDSCAPE, 2007
Wood, Epoxy
P.O.R.

In the weeks leading up to his retrospective, Cris Bruch was working on Perfect Landscape in his northeast Seattle studio, meticulously piecing together the wedges of plywood that form the gigantic horizontal disc. The piece is smeared with red resin; crusty where it is sanded down, glossy as strawberry jelly where it is not. The piece is not perfect, riddled with tiny accumulated mistakes that don’t self-correct, he says, but it’s the trial and error, the corrected, revised, fudged, improvised passages, that lend the sculpture its beauty, and its humanity. -From the catalog essay by Elizabeth Bryant


BRAMBLE, 2007
Alpolic
Wall mounted
42 x 38 x 22 inches


BRAMBLE, 2007 (left) - SKETCHBOOK, 2007 (right)

INSTALLATION VIEW - LAWRIMORE project MAIN SPACE- June 2007

MUTTERHULSE, 2007
Alpolic
90 x 72 x 72 inches
P.O.R.


 
Bruch’s work reads like a poem, the meanings unfolding the closer the work is read. The deliberation with which his objects are crafted slows the eye, deepens the reading. The objects are enigmatic and evocative, not exhausted in a single interpretation. Often, his work takes organic form—from shells to roots, to bramble branches and hulls of nuts—yet refers to concepts beyond specificity. The branching shapes of Bramble (2007) and Fox Ridge (2006) double as invasive species and subdivision; the shingled nutshell of Mutterhülsen (2007) serves also as an ancient helmet or a tiled Germanic rooftop. Department of Forensic Morphology Annex (2004), on the University of Washington campus (Seattle), which references the nearby Observatory and the Boeing Wind Tunnel Building, reads as a nautilus-shelled bunny. Its quilt-like, floating skin is cut away to expose the radiating, triangular-sectioned, jungle-gym within. --From the catalog essay by Elizabeth Bryant

PILGRIM, 2004 Paper, resin, ink 36 x 50 x 36 inches
$18,000

“[Bruch's art] is a kind of ‘conceptual craft’ typified by Martin Puryear. Rife with biomorphic forms that allude to a larger conceptual framework, such work allows the artist to engage in the sensual business of making a thing well and making it guilt free” --Daniel Duford - Artweek, September, 2006


WHAT DO YOU WANT TO TALK ABOUT?, 2000
Wood, steel, epoxy
[On Hold]


CLEAVE, 2006
Mahogany
118.5 x 21 x 19 inches
P.O.R.


DON’T FEED IT, 1993 Steel, enamel 12 x 12 x 18 feet P.O.R.
Installation View - LAWRIMORE project White Cube
Photo: Richard Nichol

“His work represents a distinct, recognizable aesthetic and remains consistently high quality – unity in diversity if you will. His art has always suggested to me a merging of the engineer and the poet, a sculpture characterized by structural ingenuity and resourcefulness while evoking the attributes and sensitivity of drawing”--Chris Schnoor, Artweek, June 2004


CHORTLES #1, #2, #3, 2001
Wood, coffee
28 x 14 x 14 inches each (roughly)
$5,700
[#1, #3 SOLD; #2 (center) Available]


UNTITLED DRAWING #2, 2000
Ink on paper
28 x 19 inches
$2,000 [SOLD, others available]
Photo: Richard Nicol


HOW DID I GET HERE?, 2001
Garbage can lids, lights, text
Various sizes
P.O.R.

Photo: Jim Frankoski


ATTENTION SHOPPERS, 1985 Steel over shopping cart
38 x 36 x 20 inches
[On Hold]

Attention Shoppers is a surviving example of Bruch’s midwestern work: the shopping cart as armored vehicle—a succinct visual link between habits of Western consumption and the military policies which sustain them.


93 PIECES, 1988 Hammered shopping cart
Dimensions vary
P.O.R.


STREET ACTIVITY, VEGETABLE CURRENCY, 1987
Photodocumentary
N/A
Photo: SAVAK

“He’s an instinctive contrarian. Whether he’s working with the sculptural possibilities of shopping carts, the dead weight of metal briefcases, collapsing piles of wire belts, graphite street rubbings, rampways made of whisky bottles or pathways strewn with old clothes, he begins with the notion that there is no assumption about material form that is not open to challenge”
Regina Hackett
Seattle Post-Intelligencer July 17, 2000


ROLLER ROASTER, 1987
Shopping cart and found objects
39 x 60 x 36 inches
P.O.R.


HONEY, 1997 Steel
14.5 x 16 x 3 inches
[Sold]


BURDEN OF PROOF / INSTALLATION, 1991 Found wine bottles, found objects
P.O.R.


BURDEN OF PROOF, 1990
Monoprint
34 x 80 inches
$5,500


JAMES 3rd CHERRY 2nd, 1988
Graphite, crayon on paper (street rubbing)
P.O.R.


STREET ACTIVITY, STREET RUBBING, 1989
Photodocumentary
N.F.S.
Photo: Drake Deknatel


*ADDITIONAL WORK NOT INCLUDED IN THE EXHIBITION and PUBLIC COMMISSIONS BELOW*

MURMUR, 2001 Redwood, mahogany
72 x 72 x 68 inches
$34,000


CLARION, 2006
Wood, pigment, glue
44 x 35 x 21 inches
$14,000

Photo: Richard Nicol


 
“Unlike many artists, he rejects the forced separation of aesthetic and political expression. Instead, Bruch locates political speculation and criticism alongside other expressions of human thought and feeling, including those more purely visual or aesthetic in nature. For Bruch, political expression is something an artist arrives at naturally, as a result of thinking about the world and the self”
John S. Weber
Art Between Objects and Actions, Pacific Northwest College of Art, 1989

DEPARTMENT OF FORENSIC MORPHOLOGY ANNEX, 2004
Stainless steel
28 feet x 9 feet 6 inches x 12 feet
University of Washington Public Commission


DUTY CYCLE, 2000 Installation view - Suyama Space

“It’s beautiful, certainly, especially the dizzying views through the wheel’s interior. The holes appear to multiply off into infinity, like the view at the corners of a clothing store’s triple-mirror array. The near-contradictions the wheel embodies – large and light, thick and hollow – make it a rather intense investigation of the commonplace of the medium of sculpture itself” --Eric Fredericksen - The Stranger July 6, 2000


DUTY CYCLE, 2000
Paper
17 foot diameter x 32 inches
P.O.R.
Installation view: Boise Art Museum

Photo: Welsh Studios, Boise